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An analysis of the Kelly Slater and Bede Durbidge paddle battle at the Quiksilver Pro Gold Coast – the top three paddling techniques Kelly uses for more Surfing Paddling Technique tips and…

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25 Comments

  • Daniel Torres 2 years ago

    paddle faster!

  • Molo mono 2 years ago

    Great vid but the example pictures in the video are wrong one one thing.
    Almost all rotation around the axis should be done in back. Always try to
    keep the hips parallel with the surface of the water, of course this is
    very hard (and impossible when taking a breath) but if you look at the
    technique of good swimmers vs the best swimmers it’s usually one of the
    biggest technical differences.

    Just throwing that out there.

  • Tavis Gustafson 2 years ago

    I don’t buy the importance of the elbow in this particular situation.
    Instead, I’d say this is a situation of Kelly having a much more efficient
    paddle style and simply tiring Bede out in the long run. Bede is thrashing
    around at one point which tires hims out while Kelly has a consistent
    stroke for the whole paddle.

  • Tony Sisto 2 years ago

    Hey there was some decent information in this video so don’t get me wrong,
    with that said dude, come on show a little tiny bit of enthusiasm. This is
    some monotone and drones on and on. I could use this to put my 8 month old
    to sleep at night. I hope your X Swim videos aren’t som bad high school
    lecture like. And you talk so slow bro, I could’ve gone through this video
    at about triple speed and learned more because you honestly lost me to the
    slow monotone audio. Lastly show Slater catch the damn wave and his ride.
    It was like a story where you never reached a climax. Market yourself with
    a different sample video. Sorry just want to help you out. Most people can
    handle a faster speaker unless your target audience is g are geriatrics. 

  • Allen Lao 2 years ago

    Terrific analysis. How do these tips apply for beginners like myself on a
    longboard? I don’t quite understand the difference between paddling
    technique for a longboard vs. a shortboard.

  • Surfdocsteve 2 years ago

    Great technique video. Common sense but it is always good to try and
    improve one’s technique.

  • Richi Proaño 2 years ago

    Learn to Paddle like World Champion Kelly Slater:
    https://youtu.be/0YjNBe9smYI

  • qwikdash 2 years ago

    Thanks for sharing the video Rob, I’ve been reading about Nick Carroll’s
    proper paddling technique. This vid provided the visuals and breakdown that
    I was looking for. 

  • heatmisered 2 years ago

    I won’t bore you with my background but I know a little bit. And I say that
    to establish some cred when I say that this is one of the best explanations
    on surfing, in regard to paddling, which of course relates to position. And
    well. That a good bit of it right. I wish this was around 20 years ago.
    Thank you.

  • Peach Kelowna 2 years ago

    paddle waddle with slater

  • sharon viquez 2 years ago

    excelent video…thank you very much..this is helping me a lot

  • loki475 2 years ago

    The biggest eye opener for me was using dark fins paddle gloves. The gloves
    resistance exaggerates the waters affect on your hands, and ideally, your
    affect on the water. I feel the “elbows up” is more to do with how your
    hand enters the water. The dark fin gloves allowed me to feel how much I
    was slapping my hands on the waters surface instead of diving them
    fingertips first. You could bend your wrist to get the hand in a good
    diving position, but that will weaken and slow down your stroke. Kelly
    doesn’t have hands, hes got paddles.

  • surfprotechniques 2 years ago

    I really like this video. It’s is very informative and presented in a
    professional way. Keeping your elbows up and kicking your feet makes a lot
    of sense after Rob explains it.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJSbKrq99-k

  • Ido Klotz 2 years ago

    Great! Thanks man!

  • Dais Davies 2 years ago

    good tips dude but you’re delivery is boring

  • Laurie Harper 2 years ago

    Thanks Rob. Paddling not my strong point. This is very well thought out and
    explained and makes a lot of sense. Will try it at the pool.

  • chad mullis 2 years ago

    The best surfers can catch more waves..
    Kelly Slater shows us how to paddle.
    Do you paddle correctly?

  • Gabriel Ascencio 2 years ago

    Thank you for taking the time and doing it so well. This helps me a lot!

  • riley m 2 years ago

    speak up homie

  • Adam Fisher 2 years ago

    Yep this works..I just watched this clip and went down to the pool. I feel
    like ive worked exact same muscle group as if i had a hard days paddle
    out. Personally I started with some normal (head under) freestyle lengths
    and then got into the head up strokes once id warmed up…thanks for the
    advice!

  • Mark Mackinder 2 years ago

    Rob, you would have a little more cred if you A: pronounced Bede’s name
    correctly. B: picked a paddle battle with a finish line. C: picked a vid
    that more clearly shows your points. In other words, “A” for idea
    (studying Kelly’s stroke). F for everything else.

  • David Galloway 2 years ago

    Thanks for the break-down. I going to put these tips to the test (:

  • danhitmansurf 2 years ago

    I needed this 25 years ago. Well done

  • scott adsett 2 years ago

    What about using swimming’s ‘s’ stroke and combining it with the boards
    flotation?Enter your hand just before the nose an extend it past the nose
    to purchase the water pull your hand down deep in the start of a big ‘s’ –
    (left arm, backwards ‘s’ on the right), this utilises your delts,
    trapezius, latissimus dorsi and a little bit if pec’s to make the major
    back muscle group work directly and efficiently. Pretend that your hand is
    the tip of a boat prop, constantly cutting the water, thumb first, until
    your arm is dead straight down in, as deep as it will go – the water is
    denser down there providing better purchase.(Think of an old flat canoe
    paddle, what happens to the water when pulled through it? It spirals/spills
    off each edge, that is why modern blades are concaved and shaped to
    purchase and release water off the blade for the stroke)
    Now release the water and bend your arm 90 deg (the nose of your board may
    be under the water but don’t worry). Now utilise your delt and tricepts to
    push straight back, as you do this, your other arm enters the water to
    start the same stroke. Now this is where you thank your shaper for that
    nose kick as your board will pop up projecting your board forward (the
    deeper your stroke and submersion of board the better the pop). All these
    flat ‘nose entry ‘boards don’t do this and they nosedive on the wave (don’t
    believe the hype of them being faster paddling)
    This stroke is hard to do and provides a lot of power. It works best in
    calm water (out the back or paddling for a wave).
    In foaming soupy water, it’s all about, short, fast arm stroke speed,
    sometimes ya just cant get away from foam – short and fast like the
    video(bad example of good padling), your paddling a lot of air anyway –
    (on a point or well defined bank) paddle wide away from the sweep and soup
    - you have little water purchase anyway.
    Once you get good, its nice to be paddling next to someone and going faster
    but your arm speed can be half of theirs (or rest an arm on your nose and
    paddle with one arm).
    This type of stroke is over 3x longer than just a windmill type stroke and
    uses muscle groups that directly pull you through the water (think of the
    difference between a straight bench press, using your pecs and an incline
    press using a combination of pecs and delts- you cant lift as much).
    Well that’s my yarn, give it a go, if it works – cool, if it dosent, try
    something different, if using your arms like a windmill works, cool but ya
    don’t see many modern paddle steamers out there nowday’s (which is what you
    will be like with straight arms, you tend to see boats with props).
    Oh I have been a professional swimming coach for 10 years and surfed for 27
    years.
    I don’t think that I am the fastest paddler and always keen to learn
    more but I always remember the old Hawaiian saying “you can paddle hard or
    smart, you should rarely have to do both.”

  • nfitz92691 2 years ago

    This is a great video. I learned so much thanks for sharing with us.